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☼ Ho'omanamana in Hawaii ☼
☼ Huna & Healing © Martyn Kahekili Carruthers ☼

Online Huna & Ho'oponopono . Hawaiian Shamanism


I dedicated years to researching the shamanic healing traditions used by native Hawaiians before the rape of the Hawaiian islands by Western interests. I studied with Papa Henry Auwae of Hilo, who was kahuna nui at that time, with Miriam Baker, Mona Kahele, George Naope, Margaret Machado, John Kaimikaua and other wonderful people.

South Kona, Big Island, Hawaii

On Big Island Hawaii, in South Kona, are tropical fruit and coffee farms, warm seas, beautiful bays ... and ancient sacred places. The old villages of South Kona shelter many sacred Hawaiian sites. Kealakekua Bay and the Hikiau heiau (temple), Pu'uhonua o Honaunau and Ho'okena provide wonderful locations for healing yourself. Further south is the Hawaiian village of Miloli'i and the wild, windy expanse of South Point, ending in the old temple of Ka Lae (and nearby Green Sand Beach).

An old magic - ho'omanamana, awaiku and ho'oponopono - seems to linger here and has not yet been obliterated by modern America. Despite two centuries of American legal, political and religious pressures, the elder Polynesian energies can still be accessed and used. And although those energies exist to serve ... we may soon lose them. We cannot use what we cannot imagine.

We have introduced many people to Hawaiian huna, teaching by demonstration and experience rather than by theory. The huna of ho'omanamana, of kanaka and kumulipo, of awaiku and I'o, of hakalau and la'au kahea can provide incredible experiences.

Julius Rodman wrote in The Kahuna Sorcerers of Hawaii, Past and Present (1979)

... outsiders made no effort to distinguish an admittedly formidable mass of superstitious beliefs from religious and medicinal systems so exalted and disciplined that they had few parallels among the most advanced Western cultures.

Small wonder then that the majority of Hawaiians still clung to their ancient beliefs in the powers of the kahuna at the end of a century during which massive assaults against their entire culture were launched by religious zealots who sought to tranquilize them while greedy Anglo-Saxon traders gobbled up their land and its resources.

Hawaiian mysticism was outlawed by missionaries and their descendents until 1979. After the illegal American takeover of Hawaii, the new haole (Western) owners of Hawaii branded most traditional Hawaiian knowledge as witchcraft, including hula dancing and chanting. Hawaiian people caught using the old knowledge were punished - often by forced labor, building roads for American fruit farmers. Traditional Hawaiian knowledge nearly died out.

Hawaiian Law: 1820 & 1868

Hawaiian people were forbidden by the new ha'ole missionaries, landowners and lawmakers to practice their traditional culture from 1820 until 1979. Healing using Polynesian rituals or even being idle was subject to punishment, often to forced labor building roads to connect the haole fruit and sugar farms with the harbors.

1820: Section 1034: Sorcery - Penalty, Any person who shall attempt the cure of another by the practice of sorcery, witchcraft, ananna (sic), hoopiopio, hoounauna, or hoomanamana, or other superstitious or deceitful methods, shall, upon conviction thereof, be fined in a sum not less than one hundred dollars or be imprisoned not to exceed six months at hard labor.'

"There is another section of the law concerning people who pose as a kahuna, taking money under pretense of having magical power, or admitting he is a kahuna. For this the fine goes up to a thousand dollars and a year in prison." - Max Freedom Long, 1948

In 1868, Hawaiian laws were expanded to forbid native entertainment. From this time, dancing hula or speaking Hawaiian at school could be punished. Both the ancient Polynesian traditions and the Hawaiian people themselves nearly died out and businesses imported huge numbers of disease-resistant laborers from countries such as China, Japan, Philippine Islands and Portugal.

1868: CHAPTER XXXVII.

SECTION 2. Gamesters. jugglers, fortune tellers, sorcerers, etc—How punished.

Any juggler, or any person who practices hoomanamana or pretends to tell fortunes, or where lost and stolen goods may be found:

Any person who practices anaana or pretends to have the power of praying persons to death

And any other idle or disorderly person may each of them be committed by order of any police court or district justice to the, jail, fort or workhouse, at the discretion of the court or magistrate, there to be detained, subject to the rules and regulations of such place of imprisonment or detention, for any period not exceeding six months:

It shall be competent for any police court or district justice to cause any idle or disorderly person to be detained for a period not exceeding two years. (1868, p.8.)

Only in 1979, in a country boasting religious freedom, did the federal government of the United States pass the Native American Religious Freedoms Act. But for most native Americans it was too little too late. Only 20% of native Hawaiians survived the onslaught of haole diseases of the body, and fewer survived the diseases of the spirit. So much was lost, and once this knowledge is gone, it can never return.

Only recently in Hawaii are people willing to even discuss the old ways - but few are left who know the traditions. Many books on native Hawaiian traditions and healing are by Western writers who promote Western psychology, hypnosis and New Age concepts mixed with Hawaiian words. If you research the older books written by native Hawaiians, you will find very different and far more interesting stories.

There were several classes of priests, or kahunas, beside those who were connected with the temples. They were seers, doctors and dealers in enchantment. All physical illness was attributed either to the anger of the gods, witchcraft, or the prayers of a malignant kahuna. The afflicted person usually sent for a kahuna, whose first business was to discover the cause of he malady through incantation. This ascertained, an effort was made to counteract the spells or prayers whish were wearing away the life of the patient, and sometimes with so great success that the affliction transferred itself to the party whose malice had invoked it. Hawaii Legends: Introduction by King Kalakaua 1888

Although Hawaiians were spared the deliberate genocide of many North American natives - Western diseases provided a similar result. After the death of about 4 million native Hawaiians from Western diseases, American businessmen imported disease-resistant Chinese, Japanese and Philippine laborers to Hawaii to work on their fruit and sugar cane plantations. Aloha.

Hawaiian Magic

Through magical traditions such as ho'omanamana, the Hawaiians believed that they could impart mana (power) into people and into objects such as wood and stone - and they could take mana from places or objects that were reservoirs of power. An important application of ho'omanamana was for healing.

Ma 'ane'i kāua e noho ai a hiki i ka manawa e kani hou mai ai ka pahu, a laila, komo aku kāua i loko o ka puka o mua. (He hale ia e ho'omanamana ai i nā akua.) A hiki auane'i kāua ma ka puka o ka mua, a laila, komo aku auane'i 'oe i loko, a pe'e a'e 'oe ma loko o kū'ono o ka hale mua. Ma laila 'oe e noho ai a hiki i ka manawa e komo ai ko kaikua'ana i loko o ka hale, a laila, nānā aku 'oe, a 'o ka mea nāna e komo a'e a ho'okani i ka pahu, 'o ia nō 'o La'amaikahiki, a 'ike aku 'oe, a laila, mai wikiwiki aku 'oe, kali aku 'oe a ka'i ka 'aha, 'o ia ka manawa e kāhea aku ai.
Hale Kuamoio, Kikowaena

There are shadow sides of ho'omanamana ... such as death prayers (ana'ana), making wind bodies (kino makani) ... causing spirit possession (akua noho), and using the poison gods (kalai-pahoa) and familiar spirits (unihipili).

Strangely, the unihipili is central to the "Huna" created by Max Freedom Long and other Western psychologists ... here is the original version ...

Of all the familiar spirits which a kahuna [sorcerer] summons to
execute his wishes, the most dreadful is an unihipili ... On the
death of the child or the near relative or intimate friend whose spirit
is to be devoted to this service, the body is not to be buried, but
must be secreted in the dwelling house of the kahu [keeper], who
will carefully remove the flesh, and in due time gather up the bones
and hair into a bundle ...

Let me here distinctly remark that the worship (ho'omanamana),
rendered to the spirit is not an ascription of power already possessed
by the object worshipped, but an imparting to it of mana (power)
which but for this worship it would never have. In short, the god
does not make the kahuna, but the kahuna often makes his god.

Read before the Hawaiian Historical Society in 1892, by JS EMERSON

Emerson's summary is very different to the simplifications popularized as Huna by Max Freedom Long in the 1930's, in which he refers to the unihipili as the subconscious mind. (Long borrowed the notion of higher, middle and lower selves from the Theosophical and New Thought teachings that were popular at that time.)

Ho'omanamana and You

You can learn ho'oponopono and ho'omanamana during our trainings in Hawaiian Spirituality. For your comfort and safety, I teach first ho'oponopono and kala, and only then ho'omanamana and la'au kahea. Perhaps read Huna, Healing and Ohana.

Are  you interested in ho'omanamana? Do you want to learn to:

  • find and use natural elemental energies?
  • learn and use la'au kahea (healing chants)?
  • access and use Awaiku (Hawaiian angels)?
  • empower objects for healing (la'au pohaku)?
  • use symbolized energies (kahuna symbols)?
  • open the door to Milu - find and rescue dead relatives?
  • advanced ho'oponopono: exorcise people, things and places?

Hawaiian Spirituality . Ho'oponopono . Huna Healing . Kumulipo . Egyptian Healing

Huna Kalani . Soul Mentorship . Awaiku

Huna Kalani Workshops

E komo mai. Welcome.
We teach in many countries - usually on secluded beaches, forests or parks.
We can meet and work online - or in beautiful places.

Do you want to heal your life?
We seek people who wish to bring back this ancient magic.

Through Huna Kalani I offer experiential introductions to Hawaiian mysticism and healing. Experience the beauty and power of Huna Kalani in a series of workshops that can expand your perception of reality. Hawaiian magic refers to a methodology that few understand. Within this old healing magic are some of the roots of the systemic magic of Soulwork systemic coaching.

Training in Hawaiian Mysticism & Healing
Huna 1 Bringing Down the Sun: Ho'oponopono & Ho'omanamana
Huna 2 Elements of Nature: Honua, Ha, Ahi & Wai
Huna 3 Dreamtime: Ho'omoe, Moe Uhane & Expanded Consciousness
Huna 4 Advanced Huna: I'o, Kumulipo and Awaiku
Huna 5 Huna Experience in Croatia, Mexico or on Hawaii

Online Huna & Ho'oponopono

Plagiarism is theft. Copyright © Martyn Carruthers 1998-2016 All rights reserved.


If you find our work useful, please link to us. If you know someone who might benefit,
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Plagiarism is theft. Copyright © Martyn Carruthers 1996-2016 All rights reserved. Soulwork Systemic Coaching was developed by Martyn Carruthers
to help people solve emotional and relationship problems, and to achieve their goals. These concepts and strategies are for general knowledge only. Consult a physician about medical conditions and before changing medical treatment. Don't steal intellectual property ... get permission to post, publish or teach Martyn's work.